Top10 Design Trends for 2012

10 Design Trends for 2012

We could pessimistically assert that there are no design trends for 2012 because nothing is getting built, but that would be exaggerating. New homes are still popping up in markets that have stabilized – just in more modest numbers, and not with the flamboyance and status-minded consumerism we saw during the housing boom. Today’s value set is more cerebral, focusing on simplicity, resourcefulness, health, community, and practicality. Here are some design themes we expect to see more of in the year ahead as America continues its search for a new normal.

  • The centerpiece of this serene bath designed by Austin, Texas-based architect Jay Corder is a natural marble slab serving as a tub backsplash on one side and a shower wall on the other. www.jaycorder.com

    Credit: Paul Bardagjy

    The centerpiece of this serene bath designed by Austin, Texas-based architect Jay Corder is a natural marble slab serving as a tub backsplash on one side and a shower wall on the other. www.jaycorder.com

Credit: Paul Bardagjy

The centerpiece of this serene bath designed by Austin, Texas-based architect Jay Corder is a natural marble slab serving as a tub backsplash on one side and a shower wall on the other. www.jaycorder.com

No Faux

Glitz is gone, at least for now. Honest architecture is the order of the day as homeowners look to simplify their lives – and, by association, their houses. This mantra of zen is playing out in interior spaces with natural finishes, clean lines, and few frivolous embellishments. On the outside the philosophy is being parlayed into elevations with uncomplicated massing. The plain box is enjoying a renaissance at a time when budgets are meager and value engineering is an exercise in survival. This basic geometry is easier and cheaper to frame, plumb, wire, clad, heat, cool, and maintain. And its pure form makes it less prone to crimes of bad proportion.

  • The “Sensible Series,” designed by D.W. Taylor Associates, addresses the downturn with a set of efficient house plans ranging from 1,560 to 2,400 square feet. Each home has a minimum of three bedrooms and 2 ½ baths. www.dwtaylor.com

    Credit: DW Taylor Associates

    The “Sensible Series,” designed by D.W. Taylor Associates, addresses the downturn with a set of efficient house plans ranging from 1,560 to 2,400 square feet. Each home has a minimum of three bedrooms and 2 ½ baths. www.dwtaylor.com

Credit: DW Taylor Associates

The “Sensible Series,” designed by D.W. Taylor Associates, addresses the downturn with a set of efficient house plans ranging from 1,560 to 2,400 square feet. Each home has a minimum of three bedrooms and 2 ½ baths. www.dwtaylor.com

Portion Control

Medium-sized house? No, wait. Make that a small, please. The average house lost a few pounds in the recession and is still managing to keep the weight off as buyers (and banks) avoid biting off more debt than they can chew. “Demand for very large houses over 4,000 square feet remains, but there is a diminishing demand for middle-sized homes,” observes architect Don Taylor of D.W. Taylor Associates in Ellicott City, Md. “Instead of the previously common request for a home in the 2,800- to 3,200-square-foot range, we are now seeing more requests for homes of 2,400 to 2,800 square feet. Cost obviously has helped precipitate this change, but I also think many buyers are coming to their senses and looking for homes that meet their practical needs rather than satisfying their egos.”

  • Smith  Fong Co., the makers of Plyboo, recently introduced new lines of FSC-certified bamboo plywood and flooring.  Both formaldehyde-free products are made of bamboo strips that are compressed into a super-dense block, which is then made into planks and panels. www.plyboo.com

    Credit: Dave Adams Photograpy

    Smith & Fong Co., the makers of Plyboo, recently introduced new lines of FSC-certified bamboo plywood and flooring. Both formaldehyde-free products are made of bamboo strips that are compressed into a super-dense block, which is then made into planks and panels. www.plyboo.com

Credit: Dave Adams Photograpy

Smith & Fong Co., the makers of Plyboo, recently introduced new lines of FSC-certified bamboo plywood and flooring. Both formaldehyde-free products are made of bamboo strips that are compressed into a super-dense block, which is then made into planks and panels. www.plyboo.com

Fresh Ideas

Your vegetables are organic, but what about your cabinets? Health-conscious homeowners are starting to see their homes as part of the wellness equation, right in stride with exercise and eating right. “The farm-to-table movement has now entered the design sphere,” kitchen designers Mick De Giulio, Jamie Drake, and Matthew Quinn proclaimed in a recent kitchen trends report released by Sub-Zero and Wolf. Buyers will soon be paying more attention to healthy details such as low-VOC paints, stains, and sealants, they say, along with cabinets and furniture made with natural products such as hay, wheat, eucalyptus, bamboo, and aspen; HVAC systems that improve indoor air quality; and appliances that filter water. Tomorrow’s kitchens could also end up trading freezer space for larger refrigeration units to keep locally grown foods fresh.

Built on the site of a former naval air station, the Glen Town Center in Glenview, Illinois, blends 154 townhomes with two mixed-use buildings containing apartments and retail shops. <a href="http://www.theglentowncenter.com" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">www.theglentowncenter.com</a>

Built on the site of a former naval air station, the Glen Town Center in Glenview, Illinois, blends 154 townhomes with two mixed-use buildings containing apartments and retail shops. www.theglentowncenter.com

Credit: Pappageorge/Haymes

Village Vibe

The suburbs are starting to feel more like little cities as planners and developers find ways to weave density and walkability into existing hot spots. “Fewer large-scale development opportunities have shifted the emphasis to smaller infill projects,” AIA chief economist Kermit Baker wrote in a recent design trends report. But these new nodes of “light urbanism” aren’t replacing existing subdivisions; they are popping up between them and connecting the dots. Prime targets for infill redevelopment include big box parking lots, dead shopping centers, strip malls, and transit stations. “People who want an urban lifestyle but either do not want to live in a ‘big city’ or cannot afford to will look to live in the many suburban town centers that have been emerging,” Urban Land Institute senior resident fellow John McIlwain wrote in a recent white paper.

  • Permeable pavers manage water runoff, control pollutants, and prevent erosion around this LEED-certified home by McDonald Construction  Development in Oakland, Calif. www.margaridohouse.com

    Credit: Mariko Reed

    Permeable pavers manage water runoff, control pollutants, and prevent erosion around this LEED-certified home by McDonald Construction & Development in Oakland, Calif. www.margaridohouse.com

Credit: Mariko Reed

Permeable pavers manage water runoff, control pollutants, and prevent erosion around this LEED-certified home by McDonald Construction & Development in Oakland, Calif. www.margaridohouse.com

Green Grows

Yes, we say it every year, but it’s true: green building is going mainstream. The latest anecdotal evidence comes by way of California’s CalGreen building code, which takes effect January 1, mandating many green building practices that were previously only voluntary. “I expect we’ll see an uptick in simple, low-cost approaches such as rainwater catchment, drought-tolerant landscaping, permeable hardscapes, passive solar design, and more recycling and landfill diversion,” says Mike McDonald, a green builder in Oakland, Calif. Watch also for more flat roofs with parapet walls hiding unsightly solar panels, predicts Costa Mesa, Calif.-based design consultant Miriam Tate.

Bridging the Gap

Little cottages may be the darlings of the homebuilding industry, but there’s still a need for homes with high bedroom and bathroom counts, and here’s why. Multigenerational households are proliferating for all kinds of reasons: boomerang kids moving home to save money; elderly parents who need family support; young parents relying on grandparent care for their kids; and rapid growth among immigrant families for whom shared living is a cultural tradition. Sure, smaller homes generally cost less than large ones, but they’re not nearly as economical as a shared mortgage and a household where everyone pitches in. Nearly 50 million Americans now live in homes containing at least two adult generations, up from 28 million in 1980. And with nationwide unemployment rates continuing to hover around 9.8 percent, that phenomenon is likely to continue in the near term.

  • Expect to see more accessory units like these popping up in backyards now that some planning boards are changing their zoning to allow detached rental units. The prefab “Carriage House” series by Bensonwood offers four energy-efficient plans constructed with panelized R-35 wall systems. www.bensonwood.com

    Credit: Courtesy Bensonwood

    Expect to see more accessory units like these popping up in backyards now that some planning boards are changing their zoning to allow detached rental units. The prefab “Carriage House” series by Bensonwood offers four energy-efficient plans constructed with panelized R-35 wall systems. www.bensonwood.com

Credit: Courtesy Bensonwood

Expect to see more accessory units like these popping up in backyards now that some planning boards are changing their zoning to allow detached rental units. The prefab “Carriage House” series by Bensonwood offers four energy-efficient plans constructed with panelized R-35 wall systems. www.bensonwood.com

Accessorize Me

Now, back to our fixation on small homes. Here’s another development that may be coming to a suburb near you: detached accessory units that share lot space with larger houses. No longer a luxury reserved for the well-to-do (fancied as yoga studios or casitas for weekend guests) these stand-alone structures are coming in handy as granny flats for elderly parents, studios for home-based businesses, or rental units for homeowners wishing to supplement their income. As rentals, the tidy dwellings offer an enticing alternative for singles who want to live a suburban lifestyle but can’t afford a big house. What’s making these residences possible is that zoning tides are turning. Many neighborhood covenants that once prohibited accessory units are beginning to ease, as illustrated by Seattle’s exemplary “backyard cottage” ordinance, which passed roughly one year ago. This housing type could prove especially popular with single women craving small, stylish homes in close-knit neighborhoods that feel safe.

  • Homes in the Country Living Collection by New World Home are about as traditional as they come and – surprise! -- they’re modular. The portfolio includes five house plans ranging from 1,100 to 2,300 square feet, each of which can be built for $175 to $225 per square foot. http://newworldhome.com

    Credit: Lucas Allen

    Homes in the Country Living Collection by New World Home are about as traditional as they come and – surprise! — they’re modular. The portfolio includes five house plans ranging from 1,100 to 2,300 square feet, each of which can be built for $175 to $225 per square foot. http://newworldhome.com

Credit: Lucas Allen

Homes in the Country Living Collection by New World Home are about as traditional as they come and – surprise! — they’re modular. The portfolio includes five house plans ranging from 1,100 to 2,300 square feet, each of which can be built for $175 to $225 per square foot. http://newworldhome.com

Factory Factor

Modular homes are still considered radical by many builders, but there’s a middle ground between box module and stick-built that they are starting to warm up to. We are of course referring to panelized walls, roof systems, and other prefab components as a means of moderating costs, reducing job site waste, and improving quality with structural pieces that aren’t exposed to weather for long stretches of time. Whereas “factory built” was once considered synonymous with “trailer park,” houses today that incorporate panelized design are nearly impossible to distinguish from conventionally built homes once they’re stitched up. And, contrary to some lingering bias, the prefab stuff is not invariably contemporary. Many factory-built homes now come in traditional styles such as Georgian, colonial, and even Victorian.

  • The sleek glass countertops in this California home, designed by architect Ginger McGann and fabricated by ThinkGlass, are enhanced with undermount lighting.

    Credit: ThinkGlass

    The sleek glass countertops in this California home, designed by architect Ginger McGann and fabricated by ThinkGlass, are enhanced with undermount lighting.

Credit: ThinkGlass

The sleek glass countertops in this California home, designed by architect Ginger McGann and fabricated by ThinkGlass, are enhanced with undermount lighting.

Spec This

What are the current materials of choice? Residential architects in the latest AIA home design trends survey report a growing interest in sustainable and cool roofing, tubular skylights that provide natural daylighting, and low-maintenance cladding materials such as fiber cement, stone, tile, and natural-earth plasters. Interiors are poised to see some new finishing options, too. Sub-Zero’s trend-watchers predict that “glass will become the next material to face appliances, cabinets, and even countertops [because it] is not only durable and environmentally friendly, but also versatile. It can be made in many colors and thicknesses, and its surface can have an infinite [array] of textures and technology, including light-emitting capabilities.” Also worth checking out: inexpensive laminate cabinet veneers made from digital photographs of exotic wood species. Wenge wood on a budget, anyone?

  • How’s this for reconstructive surgery? The Hill End Ecohouse in Brisbane, Australia was built almost entirely of materials salvaged from the 19th century house it replaced. Riddel Architecture was able to use 95 percent of the former structure, and the effect is stunning. http://www.rara.net.au

    Credit: Christopher Frederick Jones

    How’s this for reconstructive surgery? The Hill End Ecohouse in Brisbane, Australia was built almost entirely of materials salvaged from the 19th century house it replaced. Riddel Architecture was able to use 95 percent of the former structure, and the effect is stunning. http://www.rara.net.au

Credit: Christopher Frederick Jones

How’s this for reconstructive surgery? The Hill End Ecohouse in Brisbane, Australia was built almost entirely of materials salvaged from the 19th century house it replaced. Riddel Architecture was able to use 95 percent of the former structure, and the effect is stunning. http://www.rara.net.au

Mix and Don’t Match

There was a time in the fashion world when your socks had to match your shirt, your belt had to match your shoes, and your kitchen had to be goldenrod or avocado green. But the age of homogeneity has passed and we’ve entered an era of mass personalization. Nowadays it’s cooler to mix different cabinet styles, wood species, and paint finishes, and to accent new stock with an antique here or there. Although the “granite standard” still lingers, many consumers are starting to explore other options for self-expression, such as terrazzo and concrete countertops that can be inlaid with sea glass or pebbles from that recent beach trip. Or the builder-grade drawer pulls that can be swapped out for antique knobs from your grandmother’s armoire. Little things make a difference if they make buyers feel like their home was built just for them.

Jenny Sullivan is a senior editor covering architecture and design for BUILDER Magazine. This was adapted from her Dec 2010 article.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s